Bilderberg.org Forum Index Bilderberg.org
the view from the top of the pyramid of power
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Channel 4 documentary "Witnesses in the Tunnel"

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Bilderberg.org Forum Index -> Diana, Princess of Wales - d. 31st August 1997
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
CJ
Suspended


Joined: 02 Aug 2006
Posts: 540
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2007 11:37 am    Post subject: Channel 4 documentary "Witnesses in the Tunnel" Reply with quote

Channel 4 will show Diana crash pictures in its documentary, "Witnesses in the Tunnel"....occupents to be "blacked out"....so you take pictures of an empty crashed car and then add the blacked out bits and all this in the lead up to the inquiry into the crash.

The very title of Channel 4`s documentary is misleading. It implies that this is the final extent of tunnel witnesses, yet, Lord Stevens inquiry was cut short before he could question witnesses which have never been investigated before. We must also keep in mind that these pictures, real, or not, were likely taken by people in the employ of one or other SIS org.

I`d recommend that al-Fayed call all these alledged witnesses and force them to lie again. Ignoring most of whats been reported in the media. I`ll ask you to picture the scene, a big S-Class Mercedes is entering a two lane tunnel doing around 80mph, behind, are a group of bikes....THESE BIKES ARE TWO-UP, they are carrying a passenger and the pax is moving about trying to get the shot. The Merc. hits a white Fiat car and takes off towards the tunnel wall (pillars)...so how did all these "TWO-UP" bikes avoid the Merc.? Some bikes on the right and left, others behind. I find it hard to believe that all these chasers could avoid the Merc. which was slowing down fast, yet they were all able to move from left to right, avoid the car and other bikes. Cool

I think this could only happen if one or two of these chasing bikers knew what was going to take place in the tunnel. Remember, the specific area around the tunnel suffered a power failure, CCTV and speed camers failed...planning Dodi and Diana`s assassination took a lot of planning, so all/most of those in the tunnel that night were hand picked. Watch the C4 documentary, but keep an open mind.

If anyone thinks I`m wrong, or interpreting events incorrectly, please reply. Laughing


Last edited by CJ on Sun Jul 01, 2007 11:14 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Garbo



Joined: 24 May 2007
Posts: 39
Location: USA

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2007 5:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you're right.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CJ
Suspended


Joined: 02 Aug 2006
Posts: 540
Location: London

PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I watched the C4 documetary and quite a few facts were casually left out...Paul lost control of the car because of some white Fiat....no mention of car contact....as well as the Fiat, there was another car carrying (alledgedly) the press. We are given the impression that chasing bikes were 600m behind? Confused

Now forgive me, but I listened to the media reports for weeks after the crash and I was told many times that these bikes were on top of the car and the reason why Paul was driving so fast....remember, it was the pressure from following bikes that led to the crash. yet the C4 documentary tells us, that a following press car was in the tunnel with one bike, neither have been identified. Cool

The other problem I have with this documentary is the quallity of the pictures. Some were in bright colour and very clear. But most had been degraded to the extent that working out the identity of people in the tunnel would be impossible. Now who wouldn`t want to be identified???? Cool

One particular picture, which was stated, as likely the last picture taken of those in the car that night. It was taken through the windscreen, it shows Paul at the wheel, an MI6 agent in the front passenger seat and Diana, head down. Dodi cannot be seen. I`ve never seen this picture before....it had been degraded....could it show Paul in a sober light? The picture shows Paul wide-eyed, reacting to the flash, thats a quick reaction, considering the alledged amount of alcohol he`s supposed to have drunk. Cool

As I`ve said before, this documentary was designed to affect public opinion before the inquest into the crash. The other interesting fact that I noticed, was the riot police who were on location very quickly....were these riot police on standby so late/so early in the day? And why were they thought to be needed at an accident, when the first doctor on location had no idea who he was treating....yet the riot police are on their way, or on location?? Cool

Replies welcome. Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
TonyGosling
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: 26 Jul 2006
Posts: 1131
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, UK

PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DIANA: THE WITNESSES IN THE TUNNEL
http://vodapp.grid.channel4.com/c4links-web/VODLink.do?t=oneoff&i=637622

C4 Wed 6 June 9pm-10pm; rpt More4 Sat 9 June 9pm
Diana, Princess of Wales was perhaps the most photographed person in the world. Her death in a car crash in August 1997 stunned a world that had lived her life with her. The blame was put squarely on the photographers who surrounded her in death as well as in life.
For ten years conspiracy theories, claims and counter-claims have obscured what actually happened that night. Did the photographers chase Diana to her death in the Pont d'Alma tunnel? Were they too busy taking pictures to call the emergency services and did their presence hinder those services? They had witnessed and recorded one of the most terrible and iconic moments of the 20th century. But for ten years that night has plagued their lives.
This is the story of the photographers arrested that night.
The film uses some of the photographs that were taken by passers-by as well as professionals and helps to establish what went on in the tunnel that night. Some have not been seen on television before. They are the most precise record of what happened in the tunnel during the hour after the crash. One image in the film has been appropriately obscured to avoid any unwarranted intrusion into their privacy or that of their families.
For one night the press photographs became the most expensive ever, but when Diana died they became worthless. Those who possessed them were hounded and for some their careers destroyed. The photographers have never felt able to tell their side of the story... until now.
The hour-long documentary is produced by ITN Factual. (who John Reid's Home Office are trying to close down through a massive damages suit)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
TonyGosling
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: 26 Jul 2006
Posts: 1131
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, UK

PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Monday 11 June 2007

Tessa Mayes
Seeing the Diana crash through a new lens
http://www.spiked-online.com/index.php?/site/article/3466

Far from being in bad taste, the Channel 4 documentary about the paparazzi at Princess Diana's death scene brought home the importance of press freedom.

Last week, 3.8million people watched Channel 4's Diana: The Witnesses in the Tunnel. It showed some virtually uncensored stills of the scene of the 1997 car crash in Paris in which Diana, Princess of Wales, Dodi Al Fayed and their driver, Henri Paul, died, and bodyguard Trevor Rees-Jones was injured.
advertisement

The programme was preceded by hyped-up accusations that it would show gruesome photos. The press secretary for Diana's sons, Princes William and Harry, wrote to Channel 4 demanding that certain images be removed. Jamie Lowther-Pinkerton told the channel: 'I must ask you not to broadcast those photographs that depict the crashed car whilst the princes' mother lies dying in its wreckage. These photographs, regardless of the fact that they do not actually show the princess's features, are redolent with the atmosphere and tragedy of the closing moments of her life. As such, they will cause the princes acute distress if they are shown to a public audience, not just for themselves, but also on their mother's behalf, in the sense of intruding upon the privacy and dignity of her last minutes.' (1)
Conservative leader David Cameron also got involved: 'Channel 4 should take a long hard look at their responsibility. Are they making a serious programme or is it just prurient? Is this in the public interest or is this prurient? If they conclude it's prurient - and I rather suspect it is - they should pull it.' (2)
The hype was unjustified. The images included several of the crashed car while Princess Diana was still in the wreckage, but she could not be seen. There was also an image of a medic administering emergency treatment to Diana where Channel 4 had obscured her face. Many of the black-and-white images came from the 'French Investigation Dossier' but they were so dark that they looked like bad photocopies. The programme makers went out of their way to offer a documentary that acknowledged some images were too sensitive to be shown and, unusually, even showed the princes a version of the programme before transmission (3).
It wasn't the first time the images had been shown in the British media. The Sun published the one with Diana's face obscured in 2006; an Italian magazine published the photo without hiding her face, a version which is available on the internet (4).
Images of car crashes and other disasters shouldn't be censored. For all the talk of voyeurism and Channel 4 reaching a new low by being 'macabre and intrusive' for broadcasting the photographs (5), and the claims that viewers were mere 'gawpers' (6) or suggestions that the programme 'was so little warranted' (7), 'illuminated nothing' and that the subject 'doesn't need any more speculation' (7), there were good reasons for making the programme. If anything, the programme makers were over-cautious.
Much of the material used in the programme has been in the public domain for some time; yet the way it was weaved together provided the audience with a chance to see the other side of the Diana death story. Although the photographers were cleared two years after the crash, paparazzi and news photo-journalists continue to be stigmatised - and that is bad for press freedom.

In the immediate aftermath of Diana's death, a spokesman for the French Interior Ministry insinuated that six French photographers and a photographer's driver following her car were the cause of the crash. In the documentary, the photographers described how the French police carted them off on the night as if they were automatic suspects just for being there. These events weren't the only cause of the post-Diana culture of blame-the-photographer, but they helped feed a hysterical reaction.
Shockingly, the French photographers were strip-searched, forced to stand naked in front of all the police and held for two days in cells which were impossible to lie down and sleep in. They faced five years in prison for manslaughter and non-assistance to persons in danger. The French authorities seized 20 rolls of film (which could have helped prove their innocence right at the start) and have never returned them. A news blackout was imposed on the night and the managers of photo agencies were told that they faced three years in prison and a £30,000 fine if they sold any photos of the event. The finger of blame was pointed firmly at the messenger, at those who recorded the event or who were simply present at it.
As some of the French photographers talked calmly, sadly and angrily of their experiences on the night, the images shown on Channel 4 confirmed their testimony. One photographer refused to hand over his film to the police and ruined his reel in defiance instead. 
Far from causing the crash, Romauld Rat, the first photographer to arrive on the scene by motorbike just 30 seconds after the crash, tried to help the injured. Even when one photographer tried to take photographs inside the car, others told him to get back. One eyewitness said some passers-by yelled at photographers but it wasn't clear what about. It might have been simply because they were taking photographs.
Soon after, a French doctor, Frederic Mailliez, chanced upon the scene and started to treat Diana as best he could. In the documentary, he confirmed that at no time did photographers 'hamper me from doing my job'. Ten years after the event, it was moving to hear those who'd been demonised finally have their say on British television.
Photographers in Paris got on with their job and took photographs at the scene, like they would do following any public tragedy. British editors had to get on with their job in London, too, and decide whether to publish them. That's how we can see photographic evidence of news events, whether it's the car crash in Paris, the London bombings or 9/11. Unlike some other European countries, in Britain we don't normally show images of the dying and the dead in the mainstream press. But it's not necessarily tasteless to do so. They are images of life and death as it happens. 
In 1997, a trend was emerging in public life, one which dampened criticism, scrutiny and a free exchange of ideas in the name of protecting privacy and sensibilities. Some called it the 'Diana effect' - and this effect continues to haunt the way the media works today.
In 1997, the traditional media refused to publish any photos of the crash with Diana at the scene. News audiences received only the officially sanctioned images of the events. There was a groundswell of support by some journalists and others in favour of clamping down on photographers and in support of a privacy law to control the press. There were far too few people like James Whittaker, a royal reporter for the Daily Mirror, who wanted to reserve judgement on what had happened. The documentary showed Whittaker speaking on BBC News a few hours after the crash, acknowledging that the authorities in Paris at that time didn't know what had really happened. He argued against assuming the photographers were guilty by saying that a 'driver [referring to Diana's chauffeur] doesn't have to drive in such a way that an accident is then caused.' He was certainly a lone voice at the time.
The response to Diana's death amongst the media prompted me to launch a campaign against a privacy law and in support of a free press. To counter the illiberal backlash that took shape after Diana's crash, over 30 newspaper and magazine editors, television producers, journalists, photographers and lawyers agreed to contribute to my campaign booklet Disclosure: Media Freedom and the Privacy Debate after Diana, published six months after the accident in Paris (Cool.
Today, the right to privacy under the Human Rights Act and the law of confidentiality have been developed to protect people's emotional hurt following coverage of their personal life. The right to freedom of expression is now a right that has to be 'balanced' with the right to privacy. Informal pressures to protect sensibilities, like the efforts of press secretary Jamie Lowther-Pinkerton, are also common these days. Yet the right to determine what images, facts and versions of the story about news events should be made public shouldn't be the privilege of royalty and victims' families.
Victims' families may feel strongly about things whatever the facts are. At the time of her death, Earl Spencer, Diana's brother, made a passionate speech at her funeral claiming that any editors who traded in photographs of his sister had 'blood on their hands'. In an interview on Sunday, following the broadcast of the Channel 4 documentary, Spencer repeated his other point made at the funeral, that Diana was 'the most hunted person of the age' (9) as if the relations between her and the media could be reduced to a simple fairytale story about good (Diana) versus evil (the media). We can all sympathise with the distress of the bereaved. In a democracy, however, others have a right to tell their story and challenge prevailing versions of events, even if the recounting of events is painful or offensive to those affected.
It's not surprising that relatives are distressed. But what is surprising is how many British journalists and commentators continue to talk about the images and debate what happened as if the public should be indefinitely protected from these things.
Images (even old ones) and the photographers' testimony aren't the whole truth. But they are part of the jigsaw that go towards making an objective assessment of what happened. Illiberal laws and a climate in which free and honest discussion is prevented will not only result in injustice for those involved - like the photographers in that Paris tunnel - it may also deny the rest of us the freedom to make our own minds up.
Tessa Mayes is the author of Disclosure: media freedom and the privacy debate after Diana (The LIRE media group, 1998) and the spiked-report Restraint or Revelation? Free speech and privacy in a confessional age (2002). Email: info@tessamayes.co.uk.
Read on:
spiked-issues: TV and Privacy
(1) Channel 4 bosses defy princes' pleas over Diana crash photos, This is London, 5 June 2007
(2) Ibid
(3) Letter from Channel 4 to the Private Secretary of Prince William and Prince Harry, 5 June 2007 [pdf]
(4) Copied image from Chi magazine shown on Kieren McCarthy's blog
(5) Trampling on Diana's grave, Daily Mail, 28 May 2007.
(6) 'Phil Hogan on television', Observer, 10 June 2007
(7) An edifice built on sand and hot air', AA Gill, The Sunday Times, 10 June 2007
(Cool 'Disclosure: media freedom and the privacy debate after Diana', edited by Tessa Mayes, The LIRE media group, 1998.
(9) 'Diana, the fight that never ends', Bryan Appleyard, The Sunday Times, 10 June 2007
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
CJ
Suspended


Joined: 02 Aug 2006
Posts: 540
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2007 1:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don`t get this...or should I say, I do get it. This Channel 4 offering, offers very little, apart from portraying the bent Mercedes in the Pont D`Alma Tunnel as an accident.

From the Ritz`s hotel to the Alma Tunnel is about 1.6 miles. Speeds attributed to the Mercedes range from 60 to 100mph, you can view the whole area on Google Maps. I like many others have driven in Paris. At the time of the "alledged accident and on the type of road where Dodi and Diana crashed, 60 mph would have been "de rigeur" and I`ve seen bikes doing 70 and 80mph weaving in and out of fast moving traffic.

As much as this C4 offering wants to forget, the Mercedes hit a white Fiat in the tunnel. A power failure ment that "non" of the CCTV cameras were working, so the chasing pack were first on scene, so say 30 seconds behind the Merc at the time of the crash. This would place the chasers in the "Cours La Reine", quite a way back!

There were plenty of people who were much closer, French, English and Americans. These people witnessed the crash....can they verify that the chasers were 30 seconds adrift? Henri Paul was not a professinal driver and was not driving a predictable route, so when the Merc. cleared the small streets around the Ritz hotel and hit the river heading towards the Pont D` Alma Tunnel, the chasers would have been several street turns behind.................how did they know which way to go??? Cool

THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS PRESS FREEDOM

Some might want to chase this illusion....you will remember Jill Dando, she`s dead, so are a bunch of journalists in Iraq, they were targeted by the US airforce.

Don`t get sucked in by the accounts expressed in the C4 documentary. For years they were "alledgedly" gagged and bullied. This does not mean they were independent of the SIS. Livinenko was MI6 and MI6 had him killed. So why all of a sudden are these press lackys giving interviews? I`ll suggest its all about damage limitation. Cool

And all of this is followed by Tina Brown`s book "The Diana Chronicles". As one reviewer points out...Tina is in full colour (pictures), yet Diana, the most photographed woman in history, is reduced to grainy black and white`s....its amazing this book took 10 years to get to market....timing is everything! Laughing

C4 documentary and "The Diana Cronicles"....we wait for the next NWO Diana smear in the runup to the inquest. Cool
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
CJ
Suspended


Joined: 02 Aug 2006
Posts: 540
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2007 1:43 pm    Post subject: Just a thought. Reply with quote

The Diana inquest hits delay after delay. Could the judge feel, or be cornered into compelling Prince Philip to give evidence and if this senario looked likely, could Prince Philip be rendered unfit to give reliable evidence because of some sort of manufactured medical condition. Such a senario would lead to the end of Prince Philip`s public life...

....Mr al Fyad has already suggested that our Queen be questioned...now, how would the NWO get around that one? Cool
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
CJ
Suspended


Joined: 02 Aug 2006
Posts: 540
Location: London

PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

France form the ministerial level are protecting the paparrazi from giving evidence....of course, we already know there are major inconsistancies with what happened and what they stated in the Channel 4 documentary "Witnesses in the Tunnel"...

...of course, this is the first line of defence in protecting those medical people who "illegally" embalmed Diana`s body...who gave the order in France, and those who gave treatment in the ambulance. the French government could also be compelled to provide information about communications between the UK embassy in Paris and verious locations in the UK.

We now wait to see if justice Scott Baker, uses the full weight of his powers....afterall, we are in Europe! Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Bilderberg.org Forum Index -> Diana, Princess of Wales - d. 31st August 1997 All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group